Archive for the ‘Non-Technical’ Category

On Pentesting, Professionalism, & “Chill”

Tuesday, September 13th, 2016

After a recent penetration test report-out call with a client, I asked my interns if anything from the call surprised them. ChillOne of them noted that he was surprised how “chill” the call was. That was interesting to me because it reminded me that I had thought the exact same thing when I first got into consulting and pentesting. It’s easy to see how a readout call could be an incredibly tense, combative affair but in my experience the best pentesters manage to not only avoid that but reverse it.

The mood of the report-out call is an excellent barometer for something that’s critical, and often lacking, in our industry: a constructive relationship between the red team and blue team. While critical, it’s also subtle, and creating the conditions for a good relationship is a process that requires real work and empathy for everyone at the table. My advice: Start Early, Be Meticulously Professional, and Remember the Goal.

Start Early

If the goal is a relaxed, productive, (even “fun”) readout call, then the groundwork must start early. While there are other things that come before it, a detailed kickoff is really the first big chance to get moving in the right direction. As a tester your goal should be to make sure that everyone is clear and comfortable with what’s about to happen, and what exactly the client hopes to get out of it. The behavior ends up being a combination of a lot of standard questions, and sniffing around for any hint that there are either concerns or complexities going unaddressed. It’s also important at this point to really understand context from the client’s view. What’s a critical vs. a high or medium? What do they care less about than you might expect them to? Why? The more understanding you have now, the more that the entire report can be placed in context. If it feels like you’re facilitating a group therapy session where the clients are sharing their (security-relevant) hopes and their fears, then you’re probably doing something right. My team literally asks questions like “what keeps you up at night?” and “what’s the scariest thing we could do here?” Asking the big questions frankly and early helps take the elephant out of the room and moves toward productive discussion of the big questions rather than tentatively working up to them through peripheral issues.

Aside from the kickoff meeting itself, “start early” means start doing things well now so that you have a buffer of goodwill to draw on later. I’ve heard it called an “emotional bank account”: make people feel good about you, make a deposit; let them down, make a withdrawal. Ideally you always want that balance going up, but when something happens (and it’s definitely going to), you want to make sure that you’ve got a nice buffer of goodwill so that it’s understood that it was a blip in an otherwise solid relationship. Neil Gaiman once explained that people keep working because their work is good, they’re pleasant to work with, and because they deliver on time. But the secret, he says, is that it only takes two out of the three. Different people are going to be able to take a different two for granted, but know that if you always shoot for all three you’ve bought yourself some leeway if something happens.

Be Meticulously Professional

Beyond simply good will, one of the important reasons clients call in pentesters (or consultants of any kind) is to get that feeling that they’re in good hands; that someone is going to make sure that messy, complex things get taken care of properly. We’re expected to drop into situations where deadlines, resources, or nerves are already in trouble and provide some useful answers and confidence that the “Right Things” are being done. So, standard consulting practices like “Communicate well and often”, and “Don’t surprise people” apply, of course.  

But one area that security folks sometimes struggle with is ego. There typically are already plenty of personalities and internal politics involved; that makes it critical for us as outsiders to not bring further ego into the situation.

This ego can take a few forms. The first is a tendency toward fearmongering and overselling findings; wanting to be perceived as one of those “scary hacker types”. That can be helpful (to a point) for establishing technical credibility but it’s important to realize that being cool isn’t in the job description. Likewise, neither is taking credit or passing blame. Remember: Amateurs get credit, professionals get paid. The rule for blame is similar: as in the airport in Fight Club, never imply ownership of the bug. If the goal is to make something more secure, it’s rarely relevant who exactly created a bug when it’s likely process, tooling, or training that really needs to change.   

Remember The Goal

This leads into another place that unhelpful ego pops up: security absolutism.

I hear security absolutism in language like “Windows sucks because…” or “Well, actually there’s no point in fixing that because hackers could still…” (or really anytime someone starts handwaving about esoteric TLS attacks or Van Eck phreaking … you know the type).  

Real professionals need to be able to set aside the hacker mindset long enough to have productive, nuanced discussions about how to fix things. There are rarely perfect solutions, and the imperfect ones come with tradeoffs. We should all be willing to be as pragmatic on defense as we are on offense. The perception that security people are going to naysay or ridicule every suggestion hurts all of us, and makes us less effective as an industry. The “Nick Burns” mentality is a self-reinforcing stereotype we need to fight against at each encounter. Similarly, there’s an odor of superiority that often comes off some pentesters when they break a thing and speak about it publicly, as if that somehow demonstrates that they are smarter than the person who designed it. Sometimes a thing is *so* bad that an example must be made, but for my tastes those instances are far more rare than twitter and blogs would make you think.    

Even if a client is a pain to work with, doesn’t take good advice, and fights you on everything, they made at least one smart call: they asked for help. The better we’re able to appreciate that, understand their perspective, and work toward improving the system, the better the relationship and better the results. I’ll feel happier about our industry when dev and ops actually look forward to their calls with security folks, and I’ll tell you this: life’s a lot better when we look forward to them too. So remember; be professional, be empathetic, be helpful — and be chill.

What Kickstarter Did Right

Monday, February 17th, 2014

Only a few details have emerged about the recent breach at Kickstarter, but it appears that this one will be a case study in doing things right both before and after the breach.

What Kickstarter has done right:

  • Timely notification
  • Clear messaging
  • Limited sensitive data retention
  • Proper password handling

Timely notification

The hours and days after a breach is discovered are incredibly hectic, and there will be powerful voices both attempting to delay public announcement and attempting to rush it. When users’ information may be at risk beyond the immediate breach, organizations should strive to make an announcement as soon as it will do more good than harm. An initial public announcement doesn’t have to have all the answers, it just needs to be able to give users an idea of how they are affected, and what they can do about it. While it may be tempting to wait for full details, an organization that shows transparency in the early stages of a developing story is going to have more credibility as it goes on.

Clear messaging

Kickstarter explained in clear terms what was and was not affected, and gave straightforward actions for users to follow as a result. The logging and access control groundwork for making these strong, clear statements at the time of a breach needs to be laid far in advance and thoroughly tested. Live penetration testing exercises with detailed post mortems can help companies decide if their systems will be able to capture this critical data.

Limited sensitive data retention

One of the first questions in any breach is “what did they get?”, and data handling policies in place before a breach are going to have a huge impact on the answer. Thinking far in advance about how we would like to be able to answer that question can be a driver for getting those policies in place. Kickstarter reported that they do not store full credit card numbers, a choice that is certainly saving them some headaches right now. Not all businesses have quite that luxury, but thinking in general about how to reduce the retention of sensitive data that’s not actively used can reduce costs in protecting it and chances of exposure over the long term.

Proper password handling (mostly)

Kickstarter appears to have done a pretty good job in handling user passwords, though not perfect. Password reuse across different websites continues to be one of the most significant threats to users, and a breach like this can often lead to ripple effects against users if attackers are able to obtain account passwords.

In order to protect against this, user passwords should always be stored in a hashed form, a representation that allows a server to verify that a correct password has been provided without ever actually storing the plaintext password. Kickstarter reported that their “passwords were uniquely salted and digested with SHA-1 multiple times. More recent passwords are hashed with bcrypt.” When reading breach reports, the level of detail shared by the organization is often telling and these details show that Kickstarter did their homework beforehand.

A strong password hashing scheme must protect against the two main approaches that attackers can use: hash cracking, and rainbow tables. The details of these approaches have been well-covered elsewhere, so we can focus on what Kickstarter used to make their users’ hashes more resistant to these attacks.

To resist hash cracking, defenders want to massively increase the amount of work an attacker has to do to check each possible password. The problem with hash algorithms like SHA1 and MD5 is that they are too efficient; they were designed to be completed in as few CPU cycles as possible. We want the opposite from a password hash function, so that it is reasonable to check a few possible passwords in normal use but computationally ridiculous to try out large numbers of possible passwords during cracking. Kickstarter indicated that they used “multiple” iterations of the SHA1 hash, which multiplies the attacker effort required for each guess (so 5 iterations of hashing means 5 times more effort). Ideally we like to see a hashing attempt take at least 100 ms, which is a trivial delay during a legitimate login but makes large scale hash cracking essentially infeasible. Unfortunately, SHA1 is so efficient that it would take more than 100,000 iterations to raise the effort to that level. While Kickstarter probably didn’t get to that level (it’s safe to assume they would have said so if they did), their use of multiple iterations of SHA1 is an improvement over many practices we see.

To resist rainbow tables, it is important to use a long, random, unique salt for each password. Salting passwords removes the ability of attackers to simply look up hashes in a precomputed rainbow tables. Using a random, unique salt on each password also means that an attacker has to perform cracking on each password individually; even if two users have an identical password, it would be impossible to tell from the hashes. There’s no word yet on the length of the salt, but Kickstarter appears to have gotten the random and unique parts right.

Finally, Kickstarter’s move to bcrypt for more recent passwords is particularly encouraging. Bcrypt is a modern key derivation function specifically designed for storing password representations. It builds in the idea of strong unique salts and a scalable work factor, so that defenders can easily dial up the amount computation required to try out a hash as computers get faster. Bcrypt and similar functions such as PBKDF2 and the newer scrypt (which adds memory requirements) are purpose built make it easy to get password handling right; they should be the go-to approach for all new development, and a high-priority change for any codebases still using MD5 or SHA1.

Trivial Passwords Are Worse Than Useless: A Simple Case Study in Entropy

Thursday, April 7th, 2011

Apparently an email address I own is similar enough to an Indian surname that I get a fair amount of misdirected business correspondence. Despite protestations that they have the wrong address, one large financial institution however continues to send me account updates (including account numbers, balances and addresses). The documents are sent as password protected PDFs, which might be fine, except that they state in the text of the email that the password is the user’s date of birth in the format DDMMYYYY.

Complexity Fail

Those of you passingly familiar with the concept of entropy no doubt let out a groan there. For the rest, here’s why: using a date of birth reduces the complexity of the password into the realm of “trivially weak”. Entropy is a common measurement of information complexity; how “surprising” a piece of information is, or how “unknown” it is (…stick with me on this). Simply knowing that the password is a date reduces the unknown-ness of that password from a reasonably-secure level to an entirely unacceptable level.

For comparison, if we assume an 8-character password with the 94 standard keyboard symbols, we have an entropy of (8 log2(94) ) = 52.44 bits (or equivalently, just over 6 quadrillion possibilities), which is reasonable for most purposes.

On the other hand, a date isn’t just an 8 character password. It’s not even an 8 character numeric password (with obviously 99,999,999 options, or 26.8 bits of entropy), which would be weak but not laughable. In fact, it’s really a 3 character password: a month, a day, and a year. Those are respectively ~30.44 possibilities  (days per month), 12 possibilities, and 60 possibilities (assuming our account holder was born between 1940 and 2000). In bits, that’s approximate 4.93 + 3.58 + 5.91 = 14.42 bits. An analogous password described in characters we are familiar with would be a three character password made up of: a single number, followed by a single lower-case letter, followed by a single alphanumeric. So, your password options are no different (entropy-wise) than “1aA” or “8q3”, and you didn’t even get to pick your wussy three characters.

Solving 14 bits of Entropy

Let’s put this to work. First, a list of every date between Jan 1, 1940 and Jan 1, 2000. Python is my sketchpad of choice:

from datetime import datetime, timedelta
 
max_date = datetime(1999, 01, 01)
date = datetime(1940, 01, 01)
day = timedelta(1)
f = open("datelist.txt", "w")
 
while(date < max_date):
    f.write(date.strftime("%d%m%Y")+"\n")
    date = date + day
 
f.close()

Now datelist has a properly formatted date for each day in our range. How many possibilities is that?

$ head -n 2 datelist.txt
01011940
02011940
03011940
$ wc -l datelist.txt
21550 datelist.txt

That’s in line with our estimate above. Cool, let’s use that list to break a PDF created with this password scheme. Pdfcrack is a simple open-source password bruteforcing tool that helpfully takes a wordlist.

$ pdfcrack -f SensitiveDoc.pdf -w datelist.txt
PDF version 1.4
Security Handler: Standard
V: 2
R: 3
P: -1028
Length: 128
Encrypted Metadata: True
FileID: 9f86e55a12672dcd9b9a9cd3423303da
U: b89fd170770d5b802423d0ec2ae7ec6d00000000000000000000000000000000
O: 301981f88c00ebdafde32360d24b7ae0f6b8a3e1865ac314cbaec4f7cc7a3f49
found user-password: '13051959'

How long did that take?

$ /usr/bin/time -p pdfcrack -f SensitiveDoc.pdf -w datelist.txt cmd 2>&1  | grep user
found user-password: '13051959'
user 0.20

One fifth of a second. Super secure!

General Advice

So, to wrap up. Less complex passwords are reasonable in a security context where a system can monitor password guessing: web based systems, network logins, etc. Then you can respond with enforced guessing intervals, CAPTCHAs or secondary validation. However, when the attacker can take the data for offline cracking, the required strength of passwords goes way up. Using and trusting weak passwords in this instance caused this company to broadcast sensitive information that it wouldn’t intentionally expose.

The company would be much better off providing users a random 10 character code that they can write down and use to decrypt the account statements (yes, seriously, write down your passwords), or simply asking users to log in for the statement information.